New Media, Knowledge and Leadership

 

New Media, Knowledge and Leadership

 

by Madanmohan Rao

KM Consultant and Author

July 09

 

My huge reading list this month includes a very interesting book called “Leaders Make the Future: Ten New Leadership Skills for an Uncertain World,” by Bob Johansen of the Institute for the Future. There are three key skills called for in the book which blend knowledge management with new media: “rapid prototyping” is the creation of early versions of innovations; “smart mob organising” is the nurturing business or social change networks through intelligent use of electronic media; and “commons creating” involves growing shared assets for the broader industry that can even benefit the competition.

 

“Future leaders will be expert users of the next generation of online social media that will be foreign to many current leaders,” says Johansen. Leaders of the future must have a strong online identity, as well as a compelling in-person presence. Organising smart networks is already practical, and it will become required for effective leadership in the future, adds Johansen.

 

Madanmohan Rao is research director at Mobile Monday & Asian Media Information and Communication Centre. He is speaking at Amplify 09 on “How is new media facilitating the explosion of knowledge, collaboration and entrepreneurial growth in Asia”

 

 

Designing a Centre of Excellence as a KM Hub

 

by Madanmohan Rao

KM Consultant and Author

 

Many successful organisations have expanded on KM activities and institutionalised them as a centre of excellence (CoE). This calls for formally scaling up knowledge networks across traditional operational and functional units, and selecting a relatively permanent team of coordinators and champions who blend expertise with management and innovation skills.

 

At an industry level, supply chain consulting firm BrainNet is supporting the foundation of the Centre for Futures Studies and Knowledge Management at the Supply Chain Management Institute (SMI) of the European Business School (EBS). Focus areas include best practices and scenario development.

 

Such an approach can also happen across national borders. For instance, The Knowledge Management Africa (KMA) Foundation has been set up under the auspices of the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) based in Johannesburg, South Africa. It will build centres of excellence across the continent and create networks of researchers. “The main goal of this foundation is to promote knowledge management in Africa as a way of using scientific and technical knowledge as a productive force,” says Ousmane Kane, director of the African Regional Centre for Technology.

 

 

Knowledge recognition and retention becoming increasingly important

 

by Madanmohan Rao

KM Consultant and Author

 

The increasing number of layoffs during the economic downturn has serious implications: employees take with them the knowledge and expertise each has accumulated throughout his or her working life. Taken together, the struggling economy and changes in workforce demographics are leaving companies with a huge loss of knowledge capital, which will affect productivity. Knowledge maps and organisational memory systems are called for, to ensure commitment and discipline to preserve organisational knowledge, according to Ivonne Chirino-Klevans of Walden University.

 

Recognition of knowledge activities helps promote and retain knowledge in the organisation, and also helps improve the corporate profile for stakeholders and investors. Corporate annual reports increasingly mention KM initiatives and awards these days. For instance, Logica’s annual report mentions that its proactive KM programme across the group, combined with increased collaborative competency team development, an Innovation team and the recent institution of Global Operations helps to ensure that technology advancement challenges are met. Wipro’s recent report mentions that it has been inducted into the Global MAKE Hall of Fame for the second year in a row.

 

 

KM events expand across globe

 

by Madanmohan Rao

KM Consultant and Author

 

My calendar of knowledge management events is filling up fast this year, with regular favourites like KM Asia in Singapore and KM World in California, as well as other regional events. Every month the KM community in Bangalore gathers on the third Wednesday to discuss KM case studies and impacts (www.kcommunity.org). I also attend the CrossMediaWeek Picnic (www.crossmediaweek.org) in Amsterdam, Mobile World Congress in Barcelona (www.mobileworldcongress.com) and Communicasia in Singapore (www.communicasia.com) for the latest in new media.

 

Countries as varied as China and Bangladesh have also recently held KM events. China’s Knowledge Management Centre recently organised an event on KM in the publishing, automotive, systems integration, and retail sectors. Bangladesh’s Ministry of Science and Information & Communication Technology (MOSICT) also held a 5-day KM workshop for KM in the energy sector which included speakers and attendees from the Middle-East and Asia!

 

 

Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>